Mu of Zero

What happens when you get to the bottom of a slippery slope?

You end up attempting to optimize a system that has no high point.

It began simply: someone, somewhere, said that they knew a few things that they were sure everyone needed to know, probably on East Coast around 1910.

The list grew exponentially. The draws on school grew with them, and you end up with an institution designed to be bad spaghetti sauce.

Surely, though, there are some golden pieces of knowledge that everyone must know:

Reading, writing, arithmetic…

Philosophy, theology, personal finance…

Basic biology, abstract thinking skills, algebra…

Cooking, cleaning, candlestick making…

Oh, wait.

Curriculum isn’t an outcome. The fact that no one can agree on the list above, is exactly why trying to make that list is damaging. Damaging to students, teachers, parents, and a society.

Allowing someone the mentorship to discover¬†that a specific piece of content is necessary to create economic and/or social value. That’s an easy package for me to wrap. Much easier than pretending that learning to divide polynomials is the best way to become an abstract critical thinker, whatever that means.